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HOW TO STAY WARM

It’s that time of year again, temperatures are dropping and we are digging out our winter riding kit again. Most of us at Urban Rider ride all year long, and by no means do we limit ourselves to slow-speed riding in town. It’s safe to say that between us, we have picked up a few tricks to stay comfortable and warm on the bike when things get chilly. Tim put all of them together in a useful video, which we hope will help you stay cosy and safe on the bike and enjoy life on two wheels all year long.

Watch Our How To Stay Warm Video

In summary, it is all about the right layers! This gives you the versatility to fine-tune your outfit to the ever-changing weather and the riding you will be doing that day.


It’s that time of year again, temperatures are dropping and we are digging out our winter riding kit again. Most of us at Urban Rider ride all year long, and by no means do we limit ourselves to slow-speed riding in town. It’s safe to say that between us, we have picked up a few tricks to stay comfortable and warm on the bike when things get chilly. Tim put all of them together in a useful video, which we hope will help you stay cosy and safe on the bike and enjoy life on two wheels all year long.

In summary, it is all about the right layers! This gives you the versatility to fine-tune your outfit to the ever-changing weather and the riding you will be doing that day.


Choosing the right base layer is of the utmost importance and its efficacy in keeping you warm can not be understated. There are many decent options on the market but there is one golden rule: avoid cotton! A base layer’s main function is to wick away moisture from your skin, and cotton is notoriously lousy at doing that. Merino wool or synthetic alternatives are a much better tool for the job. Make sure your base layer fits snug, without constricting movement or blood flow.


The idea of the mid layer is to trap air and heat you like a big, warm hug. That is why down layers work very well, as does merino wool. Again, there are synthetic alternatives like Primaloft that mimic these natural fabrics and can be just as effective. The choice is yours and you can layer up to your heart's content. Just make sure you don’t compress these layers too much because you need those pockets of air to keep you warm and you’ll still need to be able to move when riding your bike.


This is your first line of defence against the cold. Your top layer will most likely be your protective motorcycle jacket and trousers. If your jacket is waterproof, it’ll do an excellent job at keeping the wind out. If you’re tall, make sure your jacket is long enough to avoid any wind sneaking in underneath. Again, here you can layer up if you need to. A set of waterproofs packs away pretty small and can be thrown on top to create a very effective wind barrier and another pocket of air underneath to insulate you.


Keeping your hands from going numb from the cold is paramount when gearing up for winter. Not just from a comfort perspective, it is also crucial if you want to stay safe and in full control of your machine. We have an extensive list of winter gloves that will do the trick for you. Some are thicker than others, so choose wisely when selecting yours and find the balance between insulation and feel for your bike’s controls.


If you want to get a bit of help keeping your hands warm, it does not get better than heated gloves. We have an extensive range from Rev’It, Merlin, Macna and more so you’ll be sure to find the one suitable for your riding needs. You can opt for gloves that are powered by their own batteries or ones that take their power from your bike’s battery. These gloves obviously cost more than non-heated winter gloves, but we promise you won’t look back once you take the plunge.Copy


The same principle applies to the rest of your body: get electrically heated clothes to go underneath your outer layers and you’ll be toasty in no time. Check out Macna’s range of socks, leggings and tops to compliment their gloves. They all simply link together and can be controlled from your phone, so you don’t have to go looking for buttons underneath your top layers when you are all wrapped up on the bike.


A decent heated glove will do a better job at keeping your digits warm than a heated grip, but in combination with a good winter glove, a heated grip can make a world of difference. Most are a breeze to install and once they’re on the bike, they’ll always be there for you.


Seal the gap between your jacket and helmet with a good neck tube or balaclava. Make sure it’s all tucked in nicely, and keep the wind chill at bay.


BONUS TIPS

  • Give yourself a head start and don’t leave your motorcycle clothing in a cold garage. Make sure it is at least room temperature before you gear up, so your body doesn’t have to work extra hard warming up your clothes before you even get on the bike.
  • A hairdryer is a brilliant tool to put some warmth in your clothes and helmet quickly, just make sure not to melt anything.
  • We mentioned it above, but it is worth re-iterating: avoid cotton base layers!
  • Don’t wear two pairs of socks and make sure your boots aren’t too tight. Go with a thick pair of socks but make sure they don’t get too compressed. Your feet need that pocket of air too.
  • Going for a long ride? Make sure to have a decent meal before heading out. Your body needs the fuel to burn.
  • Make sure you seal any gaps! Tuck in your base layers and neck tube, wear taller boots, make sure your gloves and jacket sleeves overlap nicely. You want to do this properly because it is incredibly annoying having to pull over to re-adjust your gear when you’re all wrapped up.
  • Avoid sweating! Break a sweat when running around getting ready in the morning and you will very quickly notice how that will cool you down once you get riding.

Choosing the right base layer is of the utmost importance and its efficacy in keeping you warm can not be understated. There are many decent options on the market but there is one golden rule: avoid cotton! A base layer’s main function is to wick away moisture from your skin, and cotton is notoriously lousy at doing that. Merino wool or synthetic alternatives are a much better tool for the job. Make sure your base layer fits snug, without constricting movement or blood flow.


The idea of the mid layer is to trap air and heat you like a big, warm hug. That is why down layers work very well, as does merino wool. Again, there are synthetic alternatives like Primaloft that mimic these natural fabrics and can be just as effective. The choice is yours and you can layer up to your heart's content. Just make sure you don’t compress these layers too much because you need those pockets of air to keep you warm and you’ll still need to be able to move when riding your bike.


This is your first line of defence against the cold. Your top layer will most likely be your protective motorcycle jacket and trousers. If your jacket is waterproof, it’ll do an excellent job at keeping the wind out. If you’re tall, make sure your jacket is long enough to avoid any wind sneaking in underneath. Again, here you can layer up if you need to. A set of waterproofs packs away pretty small and can be thrown on top to create a very effective wind barrier and another pocket of air underneath to insulate you.


Keeping your hands from going numb from the cold is paramount when gearing up for winter. Not just from a comfort perspective, it is also crucial if you want to stay safe and in full control of your machine. We have an extensive list of winter gloves that will do the trick for you. Some are thicker than others, so choose wisely when selecting yours and find the balance between insulation and feel for your bike’s controls.


If you want to get a bit of help keeping your hands warm, it does not get better than heated gloves. We have an extensive range from Rev’It, Merlin, Macna and more so you’ll be sure to find the one suitable for your riding needs. You can opt for gloves that are powered by their own batteries or ones that take their power from your bike’s battery. These gloves obviously cost more than non-heated winter gloves, but we promise you won’t look back once you take the plunge.Copy


The same principle applies to the rest of your body: get electrically heated clothes to go underneath your outer layers and you’ll be toasty in no time. Check out Macna’s range of socks, leggings and tops to compliment their gloves. They all simply link together and can be controlled from your phone, so you don’t have to go looking for buttons underneath your top layers when you are all wrapped up on the bike.